Monday, May 25, 2015

1202 Monarch of the Forest

Started 2 pm Wednesday March 28th, 2012.
This is a giant, multi-stem sugar maple tree on the top of Foley Mountain. My Brother Jim owns about 400 acres of prime Canadian shield and he looks after the trees and creatures contained therein... The large sugar maple is one of those creatures. He has transplanted some of the genetic offspring of this tree to around his home... hoping they would do as well as the monarch. I felt that this deserved a portrait for lots of environmental reasons. Some of the branches twist back and forth like gray rat snakes. I was concerned about killing the painting with a thousand strokes of the brush... one has to know when to stop...
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/monarch-of-the-forest-phil-chadwick.html

Sunday, May 24, 2015

1199 Beford Mills

Started 9 am Saturday March 24th, 2012.
The restored grist mill in Bedford Mills on the Perth Road just south of Westport dates from around 1832. It shares the same name as the town in Frank Capra's movie "It's a Wonderful Life". Settlers were an intrinsic part of the Frontenac Arch Biosphere along with the ample natural resources. The peace and solitude of the 19th century would have indeed made it a wonderful life although there would have been challenges for sure!
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/bedford-mills-phil-chadwick.html

Saturday, May 23, 2015

1198 Spring Reflections

It takes a while for the paint to dry... so this is somewhat delayed... Started 3 pm Monday March 19th, 2012. Painting the edge of Jim Day Rapids N44.52228 W76.10478.
With spring one day away, I had some time to paint after a frustrating day of missed calls and no responses from people who should respond. I channeled my frustration into a positive experience. I let myself and the paint fly. I hope it was successful. It was a beautiful day and that is all that really mattered. A muskrat came up close behind me. I also took a paddle in Margaritaville to inspect the ice and the shoreline. The ducks, geese and eagles kept me company over the water. The bluebirds, red-wing blackbirds and robins kept me company over the land.
So I was really reflecting on the day and the soothing effects of the water and the enduring nature of the forest. Nature is the one true constant in life and it is priceless.
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/spring-reflections-phil-chadwick.html
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/1198-spring-reflections.html

Friday, May 22, 2015

1196 Falling Down Ragged

Another visit to Ragged Falls on the Oxtongue River. This time I am looking down the water course at the tumble of white water molecules bouncing between the rocky bumpers like a billion balls in a giant pin ball machine. The calm water at the bottom of the falls is where I was headed. The water picks up some oxygen during this tumbling cascade. Small fish and insects get disoriented during their chaotic ride down the precipice. Fish are waiting for all three in the deep hole at the bottom. This makes the pool a great place to fish - something that is not lost on any angler, let alone Tom Thomson. We know for sure and have the pictures to prove it that Tom fished at the base of Tea Lake Dam. I bet he fished the pool at Ragged Falls as well. I would!
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/falling-down-ragged-phil-chadwick.html


Thursday, May 21, 2015

1189 Great Blue

Oils on medium burnt sienna oil tinted foundation on commercial canvas - 20 X 16 (inches) Started 5 pm Saturday Jan 28, 2012.
I have a great respect for great blue herons. They are quiet, efficient and solitary stalkers for a living and don’t leave much evidence of their passage. They seem to prefer seclusion away from the hustle and bustle of man. They are death to the resident frog population but everyone has to eat and as long as everything is in balance, it is good. For me, their arrival marks the start of spring and their departure, winter.
They have nothing to do with the other “great blue” whale except they seem to share the same attributes. Both species require our protection and more importantly, the preservation of their environment.
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/great-blue-phil-chadwick.html


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

1188 Indigo


For being so spectacular, this male indigo bunting was rarely seen. It has made the forests and meadows of Singleton Lake home. It is one of a hundred other species of birds that we know about anyway, according to the Bioblitz held at our property. We will keep the land unchanged so that they will want to continue to live alongside us well into the future.
“The egg doesn’t fall very far from the tree...” I had to write this somewhere. Our daughter was looking for the expression that the nut doesn't fall very far from the tree but I like this version better!
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/indigo-phil-chadwick.html
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/1188-indigo.html



Tuesday, May 19, 2015

1187 Gone But Not Forgotten

Oils on medium burnt sienna oil tinted foundation on commercial canvas - 20 X 16 (inches) Started 2 pm Friday Jan 27, 2012. Painting Place the Singleton Studio.
This is the view to the south across the mouth of Jones Creek. It was afternoon, early in the spring for a canoe paddle but the sun was warm and the water calm and inviting. This boathouse had long been neglected and there were a lot of construction issues showing up with age. It only stood in a couple of feet of water but that was more than enough to cause rot and ice damage. On the inside the swallows and other birds had pretty much taken over as the canvas “teeth” guarding the boat entry were no longer much a barrier for an agile flier.
Someone bought the home on the shore. Soon after the house had a huge addition and the boathouse was gone - but not forgotten. It was a landmark for years. Today there are only a few rocks showing where it once stood.
Note the difference in the forest horizon between that of the mainland to the right/west and that of Island to the left/east. The island is not large and does not support enough trees to block the sky from peeking through.
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/gone-but-not-forgotten-phil-chadwick.html
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/1187-gone-but-not-forgotten.html

Monday, May 18, 2015

1009 The New Pad

Afternoon Wednesday August 27th, 2008. Painting Place on the granite point at Singleton Lake N44.52250 W76.10514.
It was another beautiful day at Singleton Lake. I stood on the rocky outcrop and painted the lily pads of Jim Day Rapids. I always liked the different colours and shapes of lily pads. It was very hot and the sun was taking my hide off so I had to take a picture and escape while I still had some skin left … as a result, I have classified this as a studio work.
The name is because this will be our new home, all being well. There were indeed many new pads among the lilies in front of me. The pads were very active with all kinds of frogs and in the quiet, you could hear them chirping and croaking to each other.
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-new-pad-phil-chadwick.html
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/1009-the-new-pad.html

Sunday, May 17, 2015

1576 Cloudy Sunset

This is the sunset on April 13th, 2015 at 6 pm. I never get tired of the clouds or this scene looking westward across Singleton Lake. It is a good thing because I don't plan on moving. The biting insects had not yet appeared for the season but the setting sun limited my painting time and I had to retreat to the studio.
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/cloudy-sunset-phil-chadwick.html
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/1576-cloudy-sunset.html